Question: I am underweight, and don’t feel like eating sometimes. I am tired of not being able to gain weight. I tried talking to my doctor about it, but she didn’t give me a chance to explain; all she said was to eat more. When I was diagnosed with depression I wouldn’t eat as much and a part of that stayed with me I suppose. I don’t get hungry even when I want to eat. There is this supplement called Apetemin that helps people gain weight by making you feel hungry and slowing down your metabolism. Would you recommend it? -Anonymous

Answer:

Identifying and maintaining a healthy weight is an important discussion, and a common one I have with teen patients. Here’s what I usually discuss with my patients:

  1. How to determine a healthy weight

To determine whether someone is medically underweight, doctors use a tool called Body Mass Index, or BMI. This is a calculation that uses height and weight to estimate how much body fat someone has. Doctors use it to determine how appropriate a someone’s weight is for a certain height and age. There are online tools to help you calculate your BMI at home.

BMI is the most common measure about what weight is appropriate for someone’s height—but there are exceptions to this guideline. BMI is not always the best measurement for everyone. To determine a healthy weight for you, have a conservation with your doctor. Work with them to identify a healthy weight.

  1. How to know when skipping meals is a cause for concern

It’s ok if you skip a meal every now and then because you’re stressed or sick. That’s normal. Some days our bodies are hungrier than others, and that’s ok. If skipping meals becomes a regular thing, or if you’re unable to complete meals on a regular basis, talk to your doctor. If you’re also experiencing stomach problems like vomiting or diarrhea, see your doctor.

  1. How appetite plays into mental health

If this feeling of not being able to eat accompanies sadness, worry or sadness, speak to your doctor. You can also speak to a trusted adult like a school counselor who can help you find a psychologist or other mental health professional. Depression and anxiety are common problems that can cause changes in appetite and eating. These are chronic problems that can have times where they’re pretty severe, and other times where symptoms are not present, but they can still affect your appetite or mood. It’s important to have an ongoing conversation with your physician about your mental health. They can help you find the resources you need, including a psychologist.

  1. Be cautious with supplements

If you are underweight and having trouble eating, your doctor may recommend seeing a nutritionist for recommendations on food and supplements. Always discuss supplements with a provider, as they are not well regulated and need to be taken under the supervision of a doctor or nutritionist.

Appetite stimulants may be prescribed, but can come with adverse effects, including abnormal changes to the immune system, nausea, stomach problems and fatigue.

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-Dr. Terez Yonan, adolescent medicine specialist at CHOC Children’s

The post Ask a CHOC Doc: How can I safely gain weight? appeared first on CHOC Children’s Blog.